You Can Walk Up There - SINGLE 2019

Darryl Purpose

It was at a house warming gathering after I'd first moved to Nederland, Colorado. I was looking, with a neighbor, out at the continental divide. It seemed a fantasy. Untouchable. He turned to me and said, "Ya know, you can walk up there..." No way, I thought, but then I did, and then did it again. Those walks, those mountains, became church for me. The song has been percolating for 14 years. Check, done.
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Still The Birds (2016)

Darryl Purpose

Still the Birds press – what folks are saying:

“…there’s no end to the superior songs and equally adept performances, a combined bounty that’s more than capable of taking Purpose out of the shadows and soaring like those birds he name-checks in the title.”
~ Lee Zimmerman, NoDepression

“Yes, Darryl Purpose sounds like James Taylor. And, yes, he has an amazing backstory…These songs are so good they eclipse all that. Purpose has a rare flair for writing memorable mellifluous melodies, and on ‘Still the Birds’ he pairs them with marvelous lyrics by Paul Zollo, who has written a rhyming dictionary and shows it by pairing ‘Halloween’ with ‘gabardine.’ Purpose’s folksy tunes enchant thanks to their surprising twists, such as the octave-and-a-half leap in the chorus of ‘When Buddha Smiled at the Elephant.’ Elsewhere he sings about gangs, devotion, Dylan Thomas, and wars today and two centuries ago. Keep this up, and someday folks will say James Taylor sounds like Darryl Purpose.”~ Steve Wine, Associated Press (read the whole review in The Washington Post, ABC News, Yahoo News, Daily Mail)

“This is absolutely superb work from one of a kind. ”
~ Jim Hynes – Elmore Magazine

“His duet with Eliza Gilkyson, ‘The Meaning of My Love,’ …shares subtle similarities with the John Prine & Iris DeMent’s duet ‘In Spite of Ourselves,’ more softly played and articulated emotionally by Darryl and Eliza…”
~ Chris Kresge

“Whoosh! It sweeps you right up. Big guy. Big heart. Big songs. Thank you Darryl Purpose and Paul Zollo for some beautiful art.”
~ Marilyn Rae Beyer – WUMB

“Fascinating, ingratiating, controversial, interesting, deep and somewhat off-center…”
~ Soundwaves

“All 11 of the songs here, written by Purpose and his partner Paul Zollo, are intriguing, the words filled with brilliant imagery while Purpose’s laid-back, warm vocal style imbues the whole album with an underlying sense of deep compassion for the human condition. Get this album and listen with care. If you like lyrics that demand attention and that will make you think, Purpose is going to make you very happy.”
~ Rhetta – Making a Scene

“Way too accomplished an album for the indie world, if this roustabout can wrangle and corral the audience this set deserves, fireworks will ensue. Well done.”
~ Midwest Record blog
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Next Time Around (2012)

Darryl Purpose

"It’s been a long time since I put a new record in my CD player and
listened repeatedly for days."
~Robin Pressman, 'Our Roots Are Showing' KRCBfm

"'Next Time Around' is the gold standard of modern American folk"
~Nancy Dunham, Folking.Com

"So far, this is my favorite CD of 2012. There is no finer storyteller in acoustic
music today than Darryl Purpose, and it's good to have him back."
~Jim Colbert, The Folk Show, WPSUfm (Dec1, 2012)

"Once in a great while an artists work shows up in my life and stands
me on my ear. Darryl’s singing and writing have unmistakably advanced
to another level." (read full blog post)
~Louise Taylor, Recording Artist
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Stream or Buy Darryl's Music at Bandcamp

Live At Coalesce - 2005

Darryl Purpose with Julie Beaver

Sometime last winter I thought that it might be a fun thing - to have a tangible souvenir from these shows that Julie Beaver and I have been doing in recent years. So I called Julie, booked a night at Coalesce and persuaded hootmeister Steve See to MC. I asked Rick Sutton to bring his remote recording gear, and invited a few friends and fans to play audience. A few days before the event a friend suggested I set up a video camera for the people that had never been able to see us perform. I called Julie's dad, Paul, knowing the video he'd already shot of his daughter would fill a small library. I asked him to bring his camera to the show. He brought five. What you have in your hands, be it CD or DVD, is most of what happened that night. We hope you enjoy it.

~Darryl Purpose
Nederland CO Oct 2005
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THE GIFT OF THE MAGI - & other seasonal stories (2002)

Darryl Purpose

liner notes from the CD:
Until recently my holiday albums consisted of two vinyl LP's inherited from my parents. When I heard that Darryl was planning a holiday CD, I had a hard time envisioning his usual cast of wayward wanderers, guns and gamblers dashing through the snow in a one horse open sleigh. About thirty seconds into hearing the studio rough cuts I understood that, as usual, Darryl's musical instincts were several steps ahead of conventional wisdom and more importantly, my own - something we can all be thankful for.

Ranging from heartrendingly poignant to wryly humorous, this amazing collection of songs is more about the attitudes and feelings we try to embrace for a couple weeks every year, than about the holidays themselves. In keeping with Darryl's peace activist roots, each carries a message of tolerance, understanding, or hope for the future that rings true regardless of the season. Should you catch yourself being a little more accepting of others during the other fifty weeks of the year and decide to blame it on having listened to this CD one too many times, somehow I don't think he'll mind.

Rod Waller - Brockton, Massachusetts
_____________________________________________

Here's what I like about Darryl Purpose's GIFT OF THE MAGI: it's a Holiday record for grown-ups of all ages. It's not a stupid kids' record with dumb songs about inanimate objects coming to life. It's not a treacly Christmas record of smug sanctimony. Instead, it's a cycle of songs with a theme of spirituality, caring -and, dare I say it- humanity. A smart six year old is going to enjoy this. Fans of contemporary folk are going to enjoy this. Wizened grown ups of advanced years are going to enjoy this. If you're going to indulge in any Holiday cds, this is the one that gets my vote.
~Charlie Hunter

_______________________________________________
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A Crooked Line (2001)

Darryl Purpose

Crooked Liner Notes

Darryl Purpose has never taken the high road, and we're all the better for it. As a teenager, he carved out a distinguished and somewhat shadowed career as a professional blackjack player. In the mid-1980s, he joined a linear band of on-foot protesters called The Great Peace March, traversing the nation's service roads in a mad effort to stop nuclear madness. But it's in the past five years, as a full-time itinerant songster, that Purpose is fully realizing his calling. Like a long musical line before him and to follow, Purpose is a dramatist for the dispossessed, a chronicler of those Americans who, by choice or by chance, live on the heart's back streets, rising through the crooked lines like leaves of grass.

Purpose calls himself a "singer-songwriter." That's a fairly new term that brings to mind luminaries (and obvious influences) such as Harry Chapin and Steve Goodman. Like these artists, Purpose tells stories to tell truths. But the school of singing-songwriting is really lodged in the roots of American folksong, in immigrant ballads sung in diverse languages by women and men in the kitchen and out behind the house. In such songs, historical memory carries through generations, with mood and feeling preserved along with names of anti-heroes like Blackjack Davey. These stories provided the seedbed for the modern singer-songwriter, and songs like "A Crooked Line," "Bryant Street" "Oughtta Be a Highway" and "California (Rutherford Hayes in the Morning)" spring fresh from this seedbed.

For writing workshops be damned, storytelling seems to mainly be something that involves a "knack." Purpose is one of the best, and he found his knack out of necessity, he says. "It emerged when I was doing a lot of live shows. I discovered that I could tell a gambling story, or a story about the Peace March, and people would react. Then, with a nudge from Robert Morgan Fisher, the stories started seeping into the songs."

"I realized I'm not going to have mosh pits," Purpose adds. "I'm not going to have people dancing wildly. So I can connect with people through the stories."

This album's opener, co-written by Paul Zollo, offers a prime example of Purpose's craft. In a masterpiece of minimalist historic fiction, Purpose sets out against a melancholy guitar backdrop just a few sparse details about President Rutherford B. Hayes: his inaugural voyage to California, his receiving of Alexander Graham Bell's new invention, his troubled position on the dawning of concurrent American frontiers. "I'm not sure it's a song about Rutherford Hayes," Purpose says. "It's about history and how history is not what happens, but what's remembered."

Perhaps. After all, how else could Purpose make us care so much about a president who was not too well liked even during his reign? (One wonders if Purpose might next take on the legacy of Millard Fillmore.) But the song also resonates because it evokes the sadness that occasions the birth of any new epoch. It speaks to the 21st century by reawakening the 19th.

The cast of largely nameless wanderers and fate-tempters introduced in Purpose's previous albums now expands in A Crooked Line. Added to "Mr. Schwinn" and the sojourner of "You Must Go Home for Christmas" (from Same River Twice) are the narrators of "Late For Dinner" and "Crooked Line," people captured by Purpose as they are still en route to making their peace.

Other times, Purpose sheds the journeyman's cloak altogether and offers what amounts to hobo's lullabies, songs about the sheer joy of making music and rhymes. The playful "I Lost a Day to the Rain," is one of these. In it, Purpose recounts the only three characters of Western civilization who can be immediately associated with rainfall: Noah, Ben Franklin and Gene Kelly. There's not a fourth. At least, Purpose reports, no audience member on a long string of concerts has been able to come up with one.

One more song bears mention here. "Bryant Street" is among the bravest and most starkly autobiographical of Purpose's songs. It tells of the result of another wandering, this one a modern trip through genealogical tables and Internet search engines. At the end of the voyage was the discovery of a half-sister Purpose never met. I won't say more here; this story is best heard just as Purpose sings it.

In a recent profile in Dirty Linen magazine, Purpose explains his compositional talents: "I write a great half a song." Here, his partnerships with Fisher, Zollo, and Ellis Paul result in another collection of tunes that will stick around for a long while. Musical compatriots include long-time accompanist Daryl S, and the esteemed Dave Carter and Tracy Grammer, stylers of "postmodern mythic American music" whose own musical paths have often intersected with Purpose's.

And so a crooked line is blazed. The sources of this album's title are many: it's a physical description of the border between California and Nevada (and the rest of the country). It's the path of constant touring upon which Purpose the musician has staked his claim. And it's the sideways directions that songs like "California (Rutherford Hayes in the Morning)" find their way to their target, by appearing as one form and then revealing ten more. You have to be careful who you meet on the low roads: there's magic out there.

- Michael Tisserand

Michael Tisserand is the editor of Gambit Weekly in New Orleans. His book The Kingdom of Zydeco received the ASCAP-Deems Taylor Award for music writing in 1999.
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Travelers Code (1999)

Darryl Purpose

Darryl Purpose was a late arrival to the folk explosion of the 1990s. By the time he became a full-time folk singer in 1996, the competition among acoustic troubadours scrambling to find a place in the wake left by monster success stories like Tracy Chapman, Shawn Colvin, and the Indigo Girls was intense and daunting. But folk music is, after all, a storytelling genre. And when Purpose did finally hit the folk scene, he came with an unusually eclectic resume that provided him with a wealth of compelling stories to tell. His songs, which have drawn liberally from his experiences as a highly regarded professional blackjack player and a well-traveled peace activist, garnered considerable attention from the outset of his career. After the 1996 release of his debut album, Right Side of Zero, Purpose began an impressive prize-inning run in songwriting contests around the country. His sophomore effort, a one-take acoustic recording with violinist Daryl S., was released in December of 1997 with the title darryl PURPOSE; it was later reissued as Same River Twice. By the time he recorded his third album, Traveler's Code in 1999, Purpose had made enough of an impact in American folk circles to score guest appearances from well-established artists like Ellis Paul, David Miner, and Lucy Kaplansky. The confident, rich Crooked Line appeared in summer 2001, followed by the Christmas release Gift of the Magi in 2002. ~ Evan Cater

Travelers' Code is as colourful as the man himself. Darryl was once recognized as one of the world's best blackjack players and is an avid peace activist. Darryl's peace march took him across the U.S. in 9 months and on to Russia for a historic walk across the Russian heartland which culminated in the first-ever, outdoor stadium rock concert in the former Soviet Union which featured Bonnie Raitt, Santana, James Taylor and Darryl's band, Collective Vision.

Travelers' Code becomes part of you, the baritone voice and smoothly proficient finger-style guitar gently shines through on every track.

Mr Schwinn is a perfect example of this, simply crafted with the sadness of an unfulfilled love.

Child of Hearts is a traveling song, which packs a heavy emotional punch. " The past came knocking at my door - with the winnings of a card game long ago - there gift wrapped in pink dress and bow - stood the four-year-old child I thought I'd never know "

CHORUS she said " you're not the papa of my prayers - you're not the king of hearts across the sea - you are big and scary and almost never home - you're just not the father I thought you would be "

Lucy Kaplansky joins Darryl for Ring on My Hand, a vocal marriage with a really nice waltz feel. Will it last? Statistically no, but musically the dance is eternal.

The Last Great Kiss of the 20th Century. A great idea for a song with an ending that will restore your faith in humanity.

True As The River will cleanse your spirit and Annieland will rock you.

Smoke & Mirrors is an inspired instrumental, well constructed where guitar and violin play off each other beautifully.

For The Story " I live my whole life for the Story - did it all for a song - took my chances, didn't worry - about eventual outcomes - and I let some people down along the way - like a dreamer sometimes does "

The Stars All Live at Sunny's House and The Circle shine with the ancient art of story telling and Travelers' Code is the light at the end of the tunnel.

What makes this album so special is the fusion between songwriter/ storyteller and finger guitar style. It is one of the strongest albums I've heard for a long time.

Travelers' Code is Darryl's third CD.

Darryl Purpose demonstrated brilliantly his ability to survive solo acoustic recording with his one-take gem Same River Twice. His 1999 follow up takes up the challenge of denser production with mixed results. Of course, much of the burden in such an approach rests with the artist's collaborators.Purpose is fortunate in this regard; he has obviously made some valuable friends in his first few years as a folk performer. Traveler's Code is produced by David Miner, a folk-rock veteran who has worked with artists like Leo Kottke, Elvis Costello and Pierce Pettis. The album also features guest performances by high profile vocalists Lucy Kaplansky, who makes a beautifully tender duet of "Ring On My Hand," and Ellis Paul, who lends his powerful tenor to the catchy "Child of Hearts." Those songs, as well as a sensitively reworked full band treatment of the excellent "Mr. Schwinn," get the album off to a crackling start in its opening tracks. And the record ends on a strong note with the lovely title track. But much of the material in between goes too far in a folk-pop direction that fails to utilize Purpose's greatest strengths. His remarkably detailed fingerstyle guitar work is often either buried or replaced with less challenging strumming patterns. (The intricate instrumental "Smoke and Mirrors" is a laudable exception.) And his vocals, so masterful and multifaceted on Same River Twice, seem overly thin and nasal in some of the faster songs. But even without the consistency of its remarkable predecessor, Traveler's Code has more than enough bright moments to maintain Purpose's place as one of the most promising new artists in American folk.

A former professional blackjack player, Darryl Purpose is also a skilled finger-style guitarist and lyrical songwriter. He shares a bit of Ellis Paul's naive charm and sensitivity.. He has written at least one exceptional song, "The Right Side of Zero," Purpose's strongest work injects a gambler's risk-taking urge into themes of love, desire, and travel. The musical foundations lie in his dreamy, intricate acoustic guitar playing, with some unobtrusive violin and bass. Purpose finds his element when his imagination and melodies speak for themselves, as on the benedictory title track and the searing and spare "True as the River."

Based on liner notes hinting at his blackjack career, activism in the peace movement and a weekend in jail, Darryl Purpose's life has dealt him a myriad of potential songwriting experiences. Showing the storytelling influence of Harry Chapin with a bit of Bob Dylan thrown in, Purpose's third CD, Traveler's Code, revels in emotional nakedness, smoothly weaving images of love, fear, loneliness and regrets through its 11 tracks.

The album opens with "Mr. Schwinn," a song which initially elicits cringes at forced rhymes like "Mr. Schwinn was as thin as a pelican's grin," but as the story progresses telling of the Schwinn's enduring hope for love and his influence on those around him, the rhyming complements the message. Purpose won the National Songwriting Competition in January 1998 with this ballad.

The poignant "Child of Hearts" also combines pain and hope revealing the honesty of a 4-year old in meeting her father, "You're not the papa of my prayers, you're not the king of hearts across the sea, you're big and scary and almost never home...." Ellis Paul contributes harmony to Purpose's hard-edged vocals.

"Ring on My Hand," a countrified duet with Lucy Kaplansky, celebrates a couple's realization of commitment, with "Look there's a ring on my hand." While, the gravelly baritone of Purpose and sweet clear soprano of Kaplansky combine beautifully, the lyrics don't evoke the raw emotional power of most of the other tracks on this album. This song feels like Purpose and co-writer Robert Morgan Fisher (who also shared credits on "Mr. Schwinn" and "Travelers' Code") set out to write a wedding song.

"The Last Great Kiss of the 20th Century" is an intelligent romp. In this ballad, a single guy takes a chance, seeking out an acquaintance on December 31, 1999. The two take a walk on the Santa Monica pier and at the last moment of the year, culminate their affections in the "last great kiss of the 20th Century, no time to think about the millions before." She's impressed but points out that the century doesn't really end for another full year. The spoken ending to the story is a little corny, but fun.

The remaining songs continue the themes with powerfully sung lyrics. The solo acoustic guitar behind "True as the River" enhances its simple message of looking beneath the surface. "Annieland" exposes a yearning to stop running away from love coupled with a sweet melody.

The only instrumental cut, "Smoke and Mirrors," showcases Purpose's proficiency on guitar, complimented beautifully by Daryl S. on the violin. The combination is mesmerizing and all too brief. "For the Story" returns Purpose to the folk vocals he does so well, this time sliding into melancholy, leaving loves for a life constantly searching for stories and songs.

"The Stars All Live at Sunny's House," boasting a most humable melody, shows a woman living in isolation in this prayerful ballad that that pulls in elements of folklore spirituality and Catholicism. In contrast, "The Circle" creates vivid images of fire and smoking and dancing as initiates are welcomed to a pagan ceremony.

With "Travelers' Code (Follow the Light)," Purpose returns to the combined hope and yearning for love that began the journey of this album. Kate Miner, Hannah Dwinell and Olivia Miner contribute beautiful harmonies to this slow, spiritual farewell.

Travelers' Code is a diverse and emotionally charged effort from a fine songwriter and musician. by Julie Bowerman Rambles.net


You meet the most interesting people on a Darryl Purpose CD. Traveler's Code is his "produced" follow-up to his "one take," live-in-the-studio CD from 1997, Darryl Purpose. In fact a couple of the songs from DP show up in a slightly reworked fashion on Traveler's Code. Produced by David Minor, Traveler's Code introduces us to a variety of characters, all of whom we have no trouble believing are people that have drifted in and out of Purpose's life over the years. In the opening song, Mr. Schwinn, we meet An old man who fixes bicycles for the local children and builds his "perfectly-matched" his and her bikes that he is saving for his own "Mrs. Schwinn," whenever he may find her. Of course, he never does meet Mrs. Schwinn, and therein lies the story.

Another memorable character that Purpose introduces us to is the little red-haired four-year-old child that "I thought I'd never know." She has a gambler father who is never home, and both father and daughter are somewhat disappointed with their lot in life. The daughter would prefer a father who is home, and the father would prefer to not hear about what a lousy father he knows he is. On this song, Child of Hearts, we are brought into their world. As adults and parents, we sometimes need to be reminded that we're responsible for these little people who look up to us. They inconvenience us sometimes, and we certainly disappoint them, but it all comes down to needing each other and doing the best we can. No excuses. Ellis Paul does a fine job with backup harmonies on this one, and helps to make it one of the most moving songs on the CD. Harry Chapin would be proud.

On The Last Great Kiss of the 20th Century, Purpose reworks a song that he recorded on his Darryl Purpose CD from a couple of years ago. This song introduces us to two people who are going to ring the century out in style with the "last great kiss of the 20th century." Of course, all educated people know that the century doesn't really end until 2001, and this is the basis for his reworking the ending to this song. It's clever, witty, touching, and will leave you smiling.

There are many other great characters on this CD: Sunny, Annie, Mary, and Barbara, to name a few, but the most enduring character is Purpose himself. He has done a wonderful job creating the persona of a traveling man who is looking for something; his next card game, his next song, or his next love. In the song For The Story he sings:
I've lived my whole life for the story
Did it all for a song.
Took my chances, didn't worry
About eventual outcomes.
And I let some people down along the way,
Like a dreamer sometimes does.
But you know that I tried to do the right thing,
Near as I could tell what that was.
Traveler's Code will speak to all those that are looking for something. His stories are little romantic novels set to music, with an undercurrent of melancholy. They will linger with you long after the music ends.

In addition to Ellis Paul helping out on vocals, there is also Lucy Kaplansky, who once again shows that she is one of the most talented singers out there today. Other musicians who help out include: Darryl S., Bob Malone, David Minor, Walter Rodriguez, Ron Aniello, Kate Minor, Hannah Dwinell, and Olivia Minor. ~Rick Russell acoustic music.com





This review is written by Kevin McCarthy, 12/99
"Kevin and Maxine’s Celtic & Folk Music CD Reviews"
https://www.kevindmccarthy.com/music/index.html
send me an email message

Darryl Purpose, aka Sentimental Traveler, is back with a new release reprising a couple of his best songs, "Mr. Schwinn" and "The Last Great Kiss of the 20th Century," and presenting a new set of compositions. Why the nickname you ask? Because the nomadic Purpose is at his best when presenting heartfelt tales and spinning traveling tunes--sometimes separately, sometimes together, in one song.

Early on, Purpose works the more sentimental side as in the aforementioned "Mr. Schwinn" and "The Last Great Kiss of the 20th Century." Plus "Child of Hearts" and "Ring On My Hand" will also have you scurrying for tissue.

"Mr. Schwinn" is about a bachelor bicycle repairer who keeps a special set of his-and-her "honeymoon" bicycles around the back of his shop. Alas, he passes away, having never married, thus unfortunately never realizing the opportunity to use the special pair of bicycles.

Certainly fitting for the coming of a new millennium, "The Last Great Kiss of the 20th Century," has been re-fitted with a new ending. The narrator closes out the year 2000 in the same manner as 1999, but with an added delightful and surprising twist.

Building the tempo of its verses into a rocking chorus, "Child of Hearts" begins with a four-year-old daughter showing up unannounced on her father's doorstep. The daughter speaks the chorus:

"...she said, you're not the papa of my prayers
you're not the king of hearts across the sea
you are big and scary and almost never home
you're just not the father I thought you would be..."
The narrator, amidst the awkwardness, finally says in reconciliation:
"is life what happens in between
all these things we plan so carefully
now a child of hearts is in front of me
so please, little girl, don't give up on me..."
The little girl repeats the chorus but replaces the last line with "but please mr. stranger give up on me."
Purpose trades solos and duets with Lucy Kaplansky on "Ring On My Hand," a tune many couples may soon be incorporating as part of their marriage ceremonies. It goes:

"I awoke from my sleep
twas the first day of living
and a fresh dew lay light o'er the land
I put on my shirt
pulled up my sleeve
and look...there's a ring...on my hand
where before both my arms had been wildly flailing
for the want of a worthy command
they now hung by my side
both steady and sure
can't you see...there's a ring...on my hand

so I walked to the table
and I took my seat
for it seemed that the feast was prepared
and the loveliest person
that I've ever known
sat in the opposite chair

I've lived alone and the silence was deafening
out of ear of the ancients' bold plan
now I hear my heart beat
in the breast of another
and look...there's a ring...on her hand

this ring surrounds our doubt
breaks it down, kicks it out
leaving words spoke in this circle unbroken
imagine all that we can do with someone to
keep you and love you forever
now I hear my heart beat
in the breast of another

and look...there's a ring...on my hand"

"For The Story" is a quintessential Darryl Purpose traveling tune. Unable to settle down and stay attached to someone but unsure of what he is looking for, he sings:
"...I've lived my whole life for the story
did it all for a song
took my chances, didn't worry
about eventual outcomes
and I let some people down along the way
like a dreamer sometimes does
but you know that I tried to do the right thing
near as I could tell what that was..."
He closes out the song with:
..."you may find me traveling through your hometown
or playing my song on your radio
there between the lines
another chapter is unfolding
my heart is an open book and music my way home..."
The tender and sweet "Travelers' Code (Follow The Light)" closes out the release. Appropriate as a homily for funeral or remembrance ceremonies, or just in speaking one's creed, it goes:
"As you leave this place
you may feel afraid
and the dreams you offer this weary world may fall by the road
who knows where we'll be in a week or three?
so I'll hoist my heart and I'll give myself to this travelers code
follow the light
when the woods become thick
follow the light
when your eyes show you tricks
follow the light
when the waters are rough
follow the light
follow the light
cause that light is love

comes the hour to go
our heads may hang low
but you and I forever will know that we're part of this tribe
I will own my pain, you will do the same
and in the end we're beholden to this law to which we ascribe

follow the light
when the woods become thick
follow the light
when your eyes show you tricks
follow the light
when the waters are rough
follow the light
follow the light
cause that light is love..."

This former (present?) professional gambler has made an impressive foray into the singer-songwriter world in a very short period of time. His musical performances, whether subtle or forceful, command attention. Give him yours.
Purpose, on acoustic guitar and vocals, is backed by Daryl S. on violin and viola; Bob Malone on hammond organ, David Miner on bass, harmonium, glockenspeil, harpsichord, accordion, mandolin, piano and harmony vocals; Walter Rodriguez on drums and percussion; Ron Aniello on electric guitar, acoustic guitar and 8-string ukulele; Kate Miner on harmony vocals; Hannah Miner on harmony vocals; Olivia Miner on harmony vocals; Ellis Paul on harmony vocals; and Lucy Kaplansky on vocals.

Track List:

Mr. Schwinn (4:40) Darryl Purpose and Robert Morgan Fisher
Child of Hearts (3:40) Darryl Purpose and Elizabeth Fairchild
Ring On My Hand (3:08) Darryl Purpose and Robert Morgan Fisher
Last Great Kiss of the 20th Century (5:17) Darryl Purpose
True As The River (1:54) Darryl Purpose
Annieland (3:08) Darryl Purpose
Smoke and Mirrors (3:18) Darryl Purpose
For the Story (4:35) Darryl Purpose, Ed Berghoff and Kilty Reeves
The Stars All Live at Sunny's House (4:48) Darryl Purpose and Paul Zollo
The Circle (4:44) Darryl Purpose, Lisa Aschman and Elizabeth Fairchild
Traveler's Code (4:40) Darryl Purpose and Robert Morgan Fisher

Copyright © 1998-2015 Kevin & Maxine’s Celtic & Folk Music CD Reviews. All rights reserved.
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New section

Same River Twice (1997)

Darryl Purpose

ALL MUISC by Evan Cater:
Poverty, rather than inspiration, prompted Darryl Purpose to record his second album, Same River Twice (originally released as darryl PURPOSE), in a continuous 60-minute take with just his voice, his guitar, and Daryl S.'s violin. Sometimes, financial constraints can be an artist's best friend: Same River Twice is a remarkably consistent effort from a singer/songwriter who was only a year into his professional career when it was recorded. Its songs are more than capable of withstanding the warts-and-all scrutiny exacted by the minimal setting; in fact, the intimacy only strengthens them. Though Purpose, a cowboy hat wearing former blackjack pro with a truck driver's haircut and a body like John Popper, could pass for a country singer, his songs' reflective sensitivity and his fretwork's eyebrow-raising speed place him firmly in the folk camp. Tinged by a slight southern drawl, his baritone shifts between gentle James Taylor smoothness and a husky nasal tone that recalls Van Morrison when he lets it rip (as on "Cherokee" and "What Was I Thinking"). Purpose also displays an unfailing melodic ear and a sculptor's eye for detail, particularly on "Mr. Schwinn," a moving and whimsically worded story about a lonely bike repairman set to a brisk, cyclical fingerstyle riff that suggests spinning bike wheels. Daryl S.'s warm, skillful fiddling is all the embellishment Purpose needs. Same River Twice finishes with a cover of Kevin Faherty's clever tribute to prematurely departed songsmiths, "Singer/Songwriter Heaven," which imagines a celestial stomping ground for the likes of Harry Chapin, Graham Parsons, Mark Heard, and Nick Drake. Purpose has made a surprisingly strong case that he deserves a place among them.



A mesmerizing storyteller who draws from life experiences, Darryl Purpose is known for his gentle baritone, flawless fingerstyle guitar, and his unflinching songs presented with an uncommon mix of delicacy and grit.


"A physically imposing man, hat firmly on head and dressed in black, he bordered on the menacing, until he opened his mouth. Then his natural warmth and charm blazed through."
- Michael Mee, Southern Reporter


"America's most original narrative songwriter since Harry Chapin"
- Q Magazine, February 2001


Darryl Purpose has led a diverse and interesting life. Lured as a teenager to the world of casino gambling, Purpose went from betting dollars on the graveyard shifts in downtown Las Vegas, to being one of the best blackjack players in the world by his mid twenties. In his late twenties, Purpose left Blackjack to walk across the country (L.A. to DC) with the 'Great Peace March.' Writing and playing music as a member of the 'house band' of the GPM-his first performing experience- was a watershed event for Purpose, leaving him with a permanent thirst for the connection possible through music. This led to another march in the (then) Soviet Union and the first-ever, outdoor stadium rock concert there, featuring Bonnie Raitt, Santana, James Taylor, and Darryl's band, Collective Vision.

Purpose moved into music fulltime in 1996. A thousand shows, and 20,000 CD's later, Purpose has "finally realized his calling as a dramatist for the dispossessed, a chronicler of those Americans who, by choice or by chance, live on the heart's back streets, rising up through the crooked lines like leaves of grass" writes Michael Tisserand in the liner notes from his album A Crooked Line .


From unrequited love in a bicycle repair shop in Mr. Schwinn to spurned to ramblings of a disaffected Angelino in "A Crooked Line," we recognize that the often dark characters presented in those story songs live all around us. With his distinctive baritone voice, a smoothly proficient finger-style guitar technique which has earned him an endorsement with Taylor Guitars and a sense of drama and storytelling in his lyrics and music, Purpose delivers a charismatic performance that captures coffeehouse and theater audiences alike, including a huge supply of interesting stories from his activities as a peace activist, professional gambler and modern troubadour.




"Darryl Purpose's music hits all the vital areas: the heart, the mind and the gut... Purpose delivers these tales in language that is precise and unflinching, with a voice that rings true from experience. These songs never let go."
- New Orleans Gambit Weekly


VENUE LIST

Selected Venues -
The Birchmere, Alexandria, VA
Bluebird Cafe - Nashville TN
Circle of Friends Coffeehouse - Franklin MA
Club Passim, Cambridge MA
Freight and Salvage Coffeehouse - Berkeley CA
Harris Creek Acoustic - Hampton,VA
Hill Country House Concerts - Bulverde,TX
The Kennedy Center -Washington,DC
Kerrville Folk Festival - Kerrville TX
Live Oak Music Festival - Santa Barbara CA
McCabes - Santa Monica CA
Rose Garden Coffeehouse - Mansfield MA
South Florida Folk Festival - Ft Lauderdale FL
Seattle Folklore Society - Seattle WA
The Turning Point - Piermont, NY
Uncle Calvin's - Dallas TX


Selected Festivals:
Cambria Hoot Indian Summer Acoustic Music Festival - Cambria CA
Dogwood Festival - Atlanta GA
Falcon Ridge Folk Festival - Hillsdale, NY
Flat Rock Music Festival - flat Rock NC
Kerrville Folk Festival - Kerrville TX
Live Oak Music Festival * Santa Barbara CA
Napa Valley Music Festival - Napa CA
Rocky Mountain Folks Festival - Lyons,CO
Sisters Folk Festival - Sisters OR
South Florida Folk Festival - Ft Lauderdale FL


Discography

* A CROOKED LINE - Tangible Music, 2001
Purpose's latest includes stunning musical contributions from friends Dave Carter & Tracy Grammer, two songs co-written with Ellis Paul, and a vocal/strings arrangement performed by members of the Turtle Island String Quartet. His cast of largely nameless wanderers and fate-tempters now expands to include a mostly-forgotten president (California), a haunted veteran ( Late for Dinner) and a disaffected Angelino (A Crooked Line).

"Darryl Purpose once made his living as a professional gambler, and, like all gamblers, he knows how to tell a good tale. That, plus his sharp eye for detail, his instinctive feel for hard-living, unsentimentalized characters, and his battle-hardened, but ultimately optimistic view of the world makes "A Crooked Line" one of the best recent collections of contemporary story songs. "
-Dirty Linen

* TRAVELERS' CODE - Tangible Music, 1999
Includes the sweet wedding song, "Ring On My Hand" (a duet with Lucy Kaplansky), the soul-baring "Child of Hearts" (with Ellis Paul), and a sweetly updated "Last Great Kiss of the 20th Century"

"Harry Chapin would be proud."
~ Folk and Music Exchange
'"Purpose takes the almost indescribably intense moments of life and brings them a step closer to comprehension... "
~Mike Devlin - Music Matters Review


* SAME RIVER TWICE (originally titled "darryl PURPOSE,") - Dec 1997
Includes - Singer/Songwriter Heaven and Dangerous Game. Recorded in one take in the studio, this album highlights Darryl's dramatic guitar work, his expressive voice and his offbeat world view. With Daryl S. adding sweet and soulful touches on violin, this is an all-acoustic album that compels attention.

"...beautifully crafted literature set to wonderful melodies and presented with an uncommon mix of delicacy and grit. There isn't a filler song on this album"
~Dale Barcellos, Bluegrass by the Bay

" One of the best CD's of the year"
~Cape Cod Times

* RIGHT SIDE OF ZERO - Tangible Music, Dec 1995
Purpose' first release includes The Island Song, I Will Run, Right Side of Zero , Don't Tear Down.

"a breath of fresh air in an overcrowded market"
~Dirty Linen

"Darryl's fine guitar work is evident throughout, especially on the instrumental, 'Rootwing,' which opens and closes the album. Combine that with his hypnotic voice and heartfelt words and 'Right Side of Zero' comes close to a perfect ten."
~The Performing Songwriter



Bud Franklin:
Same River Twice
I have been following Darryl\'s career and have his full library.... he is one of the best singer songwriters in America today... in the genre of Harry Chapin as a storyteller along with as a bonus outstanding finger picking guitar style.... if you ever get a chance to see him live take it .. if you are lucky enough to see Him with Daryl S. a virtuoso violin player your in for a real treat... although I haven\'t heard of them together for years.... this is the best album as you get less produceing effects and more pure music .... love it... Buy it now

Russ & Julie:
A True Work Of Art
Same River Twice is one of our very favorite albums of the past decade or so. It's a finely crafted masterpiece showcasing the best of Darryl Purpose's songwriting, offset beautifully by the incredible Daryl S. on violin. You'll be hard-pressed to locate a superior singer-songwriter album anywhere.

Evan Cater, ALL Music:
Darryl Purpose was a late arrival to the folk explosion of the 1990s. By the time he became a full-time folk singer in 1996, the competition among acoustic troubadours scrambling to find a place in the wake left by monster success stories like Tracy Chapman, Shawn Colvin, and the Indigo Girls was intense and daunting. But folk music is, after all, a storytelling genre. And when Purpose did finally hit the folk scene, he came with an unusually eclectic resume that provided him with a wealth of compelling stories to tell. His songs, which have drawn liberally from his experiences as a highly regarded professional blackjack player and a well-traveled peace activist, garnered considerable attention from the outset of his career. After the 1996 release of his debut album, Right Side of Zero, Purpose began an impressive prize-inning run in songwriting contests around the country. His sophomore effort, a one-take acoustic recording with violinist Daryl S., was released in December of 1997 with the title darryl PURPOSE; it was later reissued as Same River Twice. By the time he recorded his third album, Traveler's Code in 1999, Purpose had made enough of an impact in American folk circles to score guest appearances from well-established artists like Ellis Paul, David Miner, and Lucy Kaplansky. The confident, rich Crooked Line appeared in summer 2001, followed by the Christmas release Gift of the Magi in 2002. ~ Evan Cater

VENTS Magazine:

Darryl Purpose: Blackjack Player, Activist and Song Writer
RJ Frometa February 10, 2016 Entertainment 1 Comment 173 Views

(Image: radiochair.blogspot.com)

Songs are formed from the threads that weave their way through our lives. Pulled from the fibers of our being and woven into a collection of beats and bars to tell a unique story, songs are the histories of our lives and one of the finest musical storytellers from the last few years is Darryl Purpose.

Much like artists such as Jo Kroger, who used her experiences of love to pen Simplest, Purpose’s first single, Right Side of Zero (1996) was a narrative fuelled by his time as a blackjack player in Las Vegas (as the opening line “Springtime sunrise on a warm dessert morning” illustrates).

In fact, since his maiden release, songs such as Ghost of Crazy Horse (2012) and Dangerous Game (1996) (see video below) have not only captured the imagination of Americans because of Purpose’s subtle tones, but because of the messages they contain.


When you scroll through Purpose’s discography, you’ll see that he’s released seven albums – including Right Side of Zero (1996), Same River Twice (1997) and Travelers’ Code (1999) – you can see that allusions to the gambling world abound.

Using Blackjack Beats to Inspire Musical Beats

By far one of the biggest influences on Purpose’s musical career was his time as a blackjack professional. A proficient player before it was trendy to go online, Purpose was regarded as one of the best in the world prior to giving it all up to become an activist of sorts. Joining a variety of social awareness movements, Purpose literally found a purpose in life beyond blackjack. However, blackjack remained a constant in both his life and his music.

Indeed, Purpose began exploring his ideals through music and began to weave his life as a gambler into his moral outlook on life and society.

Gambling with a Purpose

image: https://elcortezhotelcasino.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/1010-ElCortez-PageHeaders-Small-Blackjack.jpg



(Image: elcortezhotelcasino.com)

One of the biggest influences on Purpose’s blackjack career and one of the reasons he was able to become a member of the game’s Hall of Fame was Edward O. Thorp.

A professor of mathematics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Thorp used his knowledge of numbers to work as a hedge fund manager, invent the first wearable computer in 1955 and pen one of the definitive books on blackjack: Beat the Dealer (1962).

That book not only became a global hit, but it earned Thorp a place in the Blackjack Hall of Fame alongside many of the most notable blackjack players in history. It was this very book that first inspired Purpose to become a blackjack player after his mother gave him a copy as a Christmas present when he was 16.

This childhood gift served as the catalyst for a career that saw Purpose win hundreds of thousands of dollars at the table and, eventually, earned him a place in the very same Hall of Fame in 2009, along with the author of Beat the Dealer.

Music’s Give and Take

image: https://www.darrylpurpose.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/DarrylPurpose_Album_CarouselOfHappiness_2012-25.jpg



(Image: darrylpurpose.com)

Of all his life experiences, Purpose has often cited his blackjack career as the fuel for much of his music. However, as any artist would admit, the creative process is a reciprocal one that involves give and take – and Purpose certainly used his love of music to inspire his own emotions before he turned to inspiring others.

Indeed, Purpose didn’t simply draw on his experience at the blackjack tables to fuel his creativity. Instead, he used it in his previous career as a way to focus his mind. Like all games of skill, blackjack not only requires an acute sense of timing, but it involves a host of numerical processes and one of the best ways to focus the mind is to block out the world using melodic chords.

Whether it’s the sounds of Purpose or any other musician, music has been scientifically proven to help improve your focus. According to a study by the Wake Forest School of Medicine and the University of North Carolina Greensboro, MRI scans showed that participant’s brain activities increased when they listened to music. Moreover, when participants listened to their favorite musical genre, whether it was classic or pop, their internally focused thoughts (known technically as the default mode network in our brains) increased at an even greater rate.

From the online blackjack player grinding to the James Bond-style gambler in Las Vegas, music is a great way to focus the mind on all the skills and strategies espoused by the likes of Thorpe and his peers.

A Life’s Work in Song

Purpose clearly identified this connection between thoughts, emotions and focus early on in his life as many other artists since have done (Tom Lowe’s EP Phone was a tribute to his phone).

Indeed, for any aspiring blackjack player or musician there’s a lot to learn from Purpose. Whether it’s the way he’s used his experience to inspire his music or how he used music to inspire parts of his life, Purpose has shown that music is as much of a catalyst for life as it is a result of it.

Of course, Purpose is more than a blackjack player, but what’s clear from his life and career is that blackjack had a profound effect on his music. Indeed, you only have to listen to Dreams of Life or Right Side of Zero (see video below) to hear the undertones of a life lived on the edge.



The unpredictably and rush of emotions that one goes through at the blackjack table is often likened to the sensations an adrenaline junkie gets when they leap out of a plane at 10,000ft. Fear, trepidation, excitement and relief are all emotions Purpose would have gone through in his career and they’re all emotions present in his music.

Indeed, much like Morgan St. Jean used her experiences of being so in love that you can’t leave a destructive relationship in order to write Drown, Purpose has used the highs and lows of his love affair with blackjack to give his tracks some context.

While there’s no doubt the tapestry of his life as a whole helped shape his music, the threads that stretch back to the blackjack table are certainly the threads that bind his work together. For those wanting a new musical experience with a familiar tone, Purpose’s songs are certainly worth a listen.


Read more at https://ventsmagazine.com/2016/02/10/darryl-purpose-blackjack-player-activist-and-song-writer/#k13wqtghtkS1rLlD.99
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Right Side Of Zero (1996)

Darryl Purpose

This album is dedicated to Helen Dunham MacEachron.

Liner notes:
i met Darryl Purpose in the late 80's, on the cross country Great Peace March For Global Nuclear Disarmament. Darryl was a member of the Peace March band, Collective Vision.
One day I was reading some promotional material about CV which briefly described all the musicians and what they had been doing in the world before peace walking. Most of the bios contained details of social activism and college education; all Darryl's said was that he played blackjack. Though I didn't know him well then, I teased him about it. "Only job I've ever had." he admitted matter of factly. Years later, listening to the song, "Right Side Of Zero," I understood the acceptance, and strangely, the the loss contained in that simple reply.
"If you don't know where halfway is, how can you know if you're young or old." The gambler's life has scant milestones by which to navigate. (Though I suppose this kind of reflection could haunt anyone) But Darryl's way is not to build edifices to melancholy, because, like the poet and troubadour know, life is lived in the imagination, and imagination is one thing we do control.
Darryl's songs have a way of touching the soul of things. From the stark vulnerability of "Where You Can Find Me" and "I Can't Tell You" to the visionary hopefulness of "Don't Tear Down" and "Victory In The Struggle", the music always plucks some common chord as it kindle's the heart.
Let these songs seep lightly into your own imagination and befriend you there.
~Marc Polonsky

From Earnest Ackerman:
Darryl Purpose is good at what he does. He was once recognized as one of the world's top blackjack players. As a peace marcher, he crossed the U.S. over nine months, then continued on to Russia for a historic walk across the Russian heartland, which culminated in the first-ever, outdoor stadium rock concert in the former Soviet Union, featuring bonnie Raitt, Santana, James Taylor, and Darryl's band, Collective Vision.

In 1996, he returned to music full time and released his first CD. Right Side of Zero spent a few months on Gavins Americana chars and the title track was used in the feature film Deadly Bet.

In his first few years of touring solo, Darryl has earned a lot of attention. In September '97, he won first place in the Sisters (OR) Folk Festival Songwriter Contest and he was invited to be a judge at Sisters in 1998. He also judged the Napa Valley Songwriter Showcase in 1997 after winning that event in 1996. He released his second CD Same River Twice in November of 1997 to great reviews. In January 1998, he won the National Songwriting Competition in Florida with his ballad Mr Schwinn. Later that year, he took first place in the Rose Garden Coffeehouse songwriter competition.

From CDBaby:
Darryl Purpose has led a diverse and interesting life. Lured as a teenager to the world of casino gambling, Purpose went from betting dollars on the graveyard shifts in downtown Las Vegas, to being one of the best blackjack players in the world by his mid twenties. In his late twenties, Purpose left Blackjack to walk across the country (L.A. to DC) with the 'Great Peace March.' Writing and playing music as a member of the 'house band' of the GPM-his first performing experience- was a watershed event for Purpose, leaving him with a permanent thirst for the connection possible through music. This led to another march in the (then) Soviet Union and the first-ever, outdoor stadium rock concert there, featuring Bonnie Raitt, Santana, James Taylor, and Darryl's band, Collective Vision.

Purpose moved into music fulltime in 1996. A thousand shows, and 20,000 CD's later, Purpose has "finally realized his calling as a dramatist for the dispossessed, a chronicler of those Americans who, by choice or by chance, live on the heart's back streets, rising up through the crooked lines like leaves of grass" writes Michael Tisserand in the liner notes from his album A Crooked Line .

It is this knack for telling stories that makes the songs of Darryl Purpose stand out. He says, "It emerged when I started doing live shows. I discovered that I could tell a gambling story or a story about the Peace March, and people would react. Then the stories started seeping into the songs.". From unrequited love in a bicycle repair shop in Mr. Schwinn to spurned to ramblings of a disaffected Angelino in "A Crooked Line," we recognize that the often dark characters presented in those story songs live all around us.

With his distinctive baritone voice, a smoothly proficient finger-style guitar technique which has earned him an endorsement with Taylor Guitars and a sense of drama and storytelling in his lyrics and music, Purpose delivers a charismatic performance that captures coffeehouse and theater audiences alike, including a huge supply of interesting stories from his activities as a peace activist, professional gambler and modern troubadour.
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